The Tesla production facility in Fremont, California, received a total of 54 OSHA violations between 2014 and 2018, according to Forbes. This accounts for 75 percent of all the OSHA violations in that period among the nation’s top 10 auto plants. South Carolina residents may wonder why this is so.

There are several possible factors. Tesla employs 15,000 individuals and contractors, more than any other auto plant, which means a higher risk for worker injury. BMW comes in second with 11,000 employees. Yet BMW saw zero violations from 2014 to 2018. Tesla was also going through a stressful period prior to its unveiling of the Model S, a premium sedan. Twelve of the OSHA violations, plus at least six not available in OSHA’s database, date from 2018.

Tesla ranks seventh in terms of estimated production capacity, and it experiences half the industry average of reportable incidents. Nine accidents in the five-year period resulted in 22 OSHA violations, while seven complaints led to 18. Four incidents were unconnected to a specific complaint but resulted in eight violations.

In addition, OSHA issued 27 violations to various facilities across the U.S. that are owned by Tesla or by Tesla Energy. The Tesla CEO says that OSHA’s California branch can be especially critical. None of the other auto plants in the top 10 are located in California.

Adhering to OSHA standards can prevent many from being injured on the job, but it does not guarantee anything. Employers may still find themselves facing workers’ compensation claims. Employees, for their part, might want to see a lawyer before filing for workers’ comp benefits. This must be after they have achieved maximum medical improvement, though. The lawyer may be a great help, especially if an appeal becomes necessary. Workers’ comp covers medical expenses and a portion of lost wages.